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LUMBERZACK

Mediocre at Cresst - now with nsfw autophilia

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Thanks for the info Gordo, super insightful. I'm not sure why mine was setup the way it was, maybe it was a later model LSD, or as Demesio said, Monday morning build. I'm just glad that I decided to have the clutch rebuilt and had the plates alternate correctly.

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You paid someone to remove a few bolts ?

 

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Well, I'm assuming that a young whipper snapper like you wouldn't own a dial indicator, and other measuring tools, or willing to buy a few shims to actually do it your self.

 

Now Schimmerman would have probably invented something silly to do the job, but would have failed miserably.

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I know when I have no business doing something myself. That job being one of them, for now. Lol.

I'll gladly pay someone else to stink up their own shop with gear oil so I don't have to endure that smell.

 

I love DIY, but in some cases it's cheaper to pay a professional for a couple hours of their time rather than waste 8 hours of my own time.

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I know when I have no business doing something myself. That job being one of them, for now. Lol.

I'll gladly pay someone else to stink up their own shop with gear oil so I don't have to endure that smell.

 

I love DIY, but in some cases it's cheaper to pay a professional for a couple hours of their time rather than waste 8 hours of my own time.

 

100% agreed. also, if they fuck it up, you have someone to go back to. i worked with a buddy as his helper to setup my x8's diff. took us a while and some tools he had in his shop and some of mine, but theres a lot of tools that we had to get creative to get the same result, mainly a bearing press that was big enough. his family owns a vw shop and for whatever reason we did not have a big enough bearing puller to get the old bearings off, ended up buying new ones anyways as the old ones had TINY amount of rust starting.. car sat for a long time off and on.

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Yes, that is the exact situation I was intending to avoid when I decided to have a professional rebuild the differential. I don't have a bearing press whatsoever; on top of that, I don't have the proper measuring tools. I don't regret my decision for a moment. Plus the guy is a Toyota differential expert for the last 30 years, featured in many magazines since the 90's. A cool guy to befriend.

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I know when I have no business doing something myself. That job being one of them, for now. Lol.

I'll gladly pay someone else to stink up their own shop with gear oil so I don't have to endure that smell.

 

I love DIY, but in some cases it's cheaper to pay a professional for a couple hours of their time rather than waste 8 hours of my own time.

 

 

Exactly. Most people on here don't do their own wiring, because they're either afraid of burning their shit down by wiring it incorrectly or it's not worth their time and effort. I love doing my own wiring, but I feel comfortable doing it because I do it for a living.

 

Setting up a diff is something I won't touch with a ten foot pole, even if I had all the tools. It's not something I would feel confident in doing, so I'll leave it to a professional.

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Not that difficult.

Need a press, only if changing bearings.

Many local shops will press bearings on for next to nothing.

Need a magnetic base dial indicator, and even a pos from china harbor, or e-gay ill work.

Need a micrometer to measure the shims with.

And of course a few extra shims, so you can adjust.

 

Minus the press, there is hardly $150 of stuff there....

 

Book say how to set end play on diff, and it's so easy, it's silly.

Stick diff in housing, stick one shim in one side, then find another shim that will go in by hand 2/3rds of the way, and tap into place.

Now put mag indicator on housing, set indicator so it's contacting a tooth on the ring gear at a right angle.

Hold pinion from turning, and rotate ring gear back & forth. Read what the indicator says the ring gear is moving.

If too much, move diff closer to the pinion by putting a thinner shim on one side, and a thicker (by same amount) on the other.

 

This is easier than finding something on TV that isn't a reality show, or a sitcom.

 

It's not fucking magic, or rocket science.

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Boris, I'm definitely enjoying dabbling in doing my own wiring. Since having the proper crimpers and invested in an assortment of factory connectors, milspec wire, and wire sheathing, it is so satisfying making factory style connections and not having vampire splices all over my harness. lol. I still get nervous about burning my car down, but it's generally me overthinking the situation.

Gordo, shimming a diff sounds about as simple as shimming a diff for an R/C car, which I used to do a lot of. With R/C cars, I didn't use dial indicators. I would add a shim or two and put the diff back on the car. If it still felt sloppy I'd add a shim, if it was tight and crunchy, I'd take a shim out. With that said, R/C cars are cheaper to fuck up on.

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Wait, were we not talking Cressida diff ?

Know of some RC cars that cost more than an X8 is worth these days.

Stop being a pussy.

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Yes, wiring is very satisfying. There's nothing like a clean engine bay and not having giant spiderwebs of wiring criss crossing all over the place. I'm excited to test fit my harness and have a clean engine bay.

 

 

A couple things to keep in mind:

 

Very rarely do I cut wires by accident with cutters when I wire things. In my experience, damaged wire usually occurs from chafing, rubbing, or being dragged across a sharp edge or being strained.

 

If everything is protected properly with fuses/breakers, the right gauge wire is used, crimps are good, grounds are good and your wiring is routed away from anything that can catch fire, you'll be fine.

 

Moisture proof and seal the shit out of everything. If you don't use glueline or moisture proof splices on any splices exposed to the elements, or even in your interior, your shit will have problems.

 

After you make a crimp, make sure that it is tight by pulling on it.

 

Don't buy cheap shit. Any autozone/radioshack stuff is unacceptable.

 

Stay organized and don't tear oem harnesses apart all at once. Keep things as neat as possible.

 

And most importantly, like with anything, buy good tools. They make life so much easier.

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I think I researched on and off for 6 months before I started buying my gear. There are so many companies it can be difficult to weed through the China bullshit. Thanks for the advice!

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Another short absence from the forums resulted in more progress on my Cressida. Since about the end of January I have decide to dive into something I've always wanted to do which was paint a car. I used to airbrush R/C car shells for extra cash when I was younger and into that hobby, but I have progressively grown away from it as it became less of a lucrative way for me to fund my hobbies. Painting has been something that always interested me and I'm excited to have a car to practice with.

 

My first step was to get all my aero parts to fit the way I wanted. I brought my car and BIGWIN bumper to the fab shop that made my bash bars and had him adjust the bars to fit the BIGWIN since the Joe's aero I had previously fit like ass.

 

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My SerialNine rear bumper arrived along with my Yamaha rear wing. I did not get a BIGWIN rear bumper because BIGWIN only sells rear bumper aprons that you fit onto a JDM rear bumper. I'm not a fan of that style so I decided the S9 unit would suit best.

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Unfortunately the bumper came damaged during shipping. Thankfully G's customer service was awesome enough to help me out.

 

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Test fit of the bumper and wing looks good.

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I have the wing mounted and I love the look. I know many people don't care for it, or like the wingless trunk better, but I think it looks great and ties in the 90's Toyota theme.

 

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Time to get serious and tear into this project. Taking off just about everything. I'm extremely particular and since I'm doing a full color change, I don't want any red if possible. That means, under trunk, under hood, inside jams, behind the doors, and whatever else. Removing trim, removing door panels, etc.

 

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Time to get my materials together. I'll be doing some body filler on small dents, high fill, primer, sealer, basecoat, clearcoat.

 

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For the last 6 months, I've had in my mind that I was going to paint my car red. Not the factory Cressida red, but the factory AE86 red. Just a solid bright red. This was a decision I decided on because the whole car is red and I wouldn't have to paint the jams or under the hood, etc. A month before I decided to paint the car, I was messing with ideas on Photoshop and fell in love with one of them. I decided to nut up, do the work and do it the way I envisioned.

I choose to stick with factory Toyota colors. I always loved two tone, but didn't want the typical JZX two tones. After a lot of Photoshop, I came up with champagne and bronze.

 

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I'll be using R-M Diamont for my basecoat. BASF is one of the best companies in the paint industry and their color match is second to none. It was a no brainer aside from the steep price.

 

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Time to scuff up the dents and apply body filler.

 

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My friend told me I should shave my antenna.... So we shaved my antenna. I hate the radio and its headache inducing bullshit.

 

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Taking off the body trim wasn't too bad, but removing this glue, even with a special tool was a task meant for autistic children.

 

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Got the car all scuffed and ready for high fill primer.

 

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HIGH FILL.

 

 

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Time to wet sand the high fill and remove the unnecessary primer to leave a flat smooth surface.

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Baby ass smooth.

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WHAT ANTENNA?!

 

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My friend and I fixed the bumper. There was a lot more work than what is pictured that needed to be done unfortunately, but it is what it is...


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Scuffed all the parts before applying primer. I only used primer on the parts. There's no point in using high fill on parts that you didn't do body work on so primer is good enough. The primer on the parts will also be wet sanded before they get sealed.

 

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Wet Sanding the primer step 1.


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Step 2.

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Step 3.

 

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